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Keep reading to find out why a sovereign-based communication solution may be the answer to your company’s privacy and security challenges.

 

In Europe, the Middle East, and Africa (EMEA), the adoption of sovereign-based collaboration solutions is a growing trend. It’s a trend that reflects the growing importance of data privacy and security in the digital age, and the desire of organizations to have greater control over their data and the way it is used.

 

This trend towards sovereign communications/collaboration solutions is driven by a number of factors, including:

  1. Data Privacy Concerns: With increasing concerns about data privacy and the protection of personal information, many organizations in the EMEA region are looking for solutions that allow them to store and process data within their own borders, rather than relying on solutions provided by third-party providers based in other countries.



  2. Compliance with Local Regulations: There are a number of data protection regulations in the EMEA region that impose strict requirements on the handling of personal data. By using sovereign-based collaboration solutions, organizations can ensure that they are fully compliant with these regulations.



  3. Cybersecurity Risks: As cyber threats continue to increase, organizations seek solutions that can help mitigate the risks associated with the storage and transmission of sensitive data. Sovereign-based collaboration solutions can help address these risks by providing organizations with greater control over their data and the ability to secure it within their own borders.



  4. Cost Savings: For some organizations, using a sovereign-based collaboration solution can be more cost-effective than using a third-party provider, as it eliminates the need to pay for data storage and transmission costs.



  5. Competitive Advantage: For some organizations, using a sovereign-based collaboration solution can provide a competitive advantage, as it can help them better protect their intellectual property and sensitive business information.

 

When it comes to compliant and secure collaboration, there are several key considerations to keep in mind. These are the top 5 things to consider:

  1. Data protection and privacy: Ensure that all data being shared is protected and kept confidential, in accordance with any relevant regulations such as GDPR or HIPAA. This means implementing proper access controls, encryption, and audit trails to protect sensitive information.

  2. User authentication and authorization: Make sure that only authorized users have access to the information being shared. This can be achieved through implementing strong authentication mechanisms, such as multi-factor authentication, and by carefully managing access permissions.

  3. Device security: Ensure that all devices used for collaboration are secure and up to date with the latest security patches. This includes laptops, smartphones, and any other devices that may be used to access sensitive information.

  4. Network security: Ensure that all communication channels are secure and protected from hacking, eavesdropping, and other forms of tampering. This can be achieved through the use of secure protocols, such as SSL/TLS, and by implementing firewalls, intrusion detection systems, and other security controls.

  5. Continuous monitoring and audit: Regularly monitor and audit the collaboration platform and systems to ensure that they are operating securely and in compliance with any relevant regulations. This will help to identify any security incidents and vulnerabilities, allowing them to be addressed before they can be exploited by malicious actors.

 

In the European, Middle Eastern, and African (EMEA) region, there are several key regulations that govern data privacy within video collaboration. Here are the top 5:

  1. General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR): The GDPR is a comprehensive data protection regulation that applies to all organizations operating in the European Union (EU). It sets out strict rules for how personal data must be collected, processed, and stored, and gives individuals significant rights in relation to their personal data. 



  2. ePrivacy Regulation: This regulation sets out specific rules for the processing of personal data in the context of electronic communications, such as email and instant messaging. It places additional restrictions on the use of cookies and similar technologies and sets out rules for the use of electronic communication for direct marketing purposes.



  3. Cybersecurity Regulations: Many countries in the EMEA region have introduced specific cybersecurity regulations, such as the Network and Information Systems (NIS) Directive in the EU, that set out specific requirements for protecting personal data in the context of cyber threats. Find out does the EU’s new cyber security directive NIS2 impact you?



  4. Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA): For organizations operating in the healthcare sector, HIPAA sets out strict rules for the protection of personal health information (PHI). This includes requirements for the secure transmission of PHI over video collaboration platforms. 



  5. Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA 2018): In the United Kingdom, the DPA 2018 implements the GDPR, setting out specific rules for how personal data must be handled in the UK. It replaces the 1995 Data Protection Act and gives individuals greater control over their personal data.

 

It is important to note that these regulations can change over time, and that there may be additional regulations that apply depending on the specific context of the video collaboration. Organizations should seek advice from legal experts to ensure they are fully compliant with all relevant data privacy regulations.

 

 

What is FISA 702?

 

FISA 702 refers to Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), which is a U.S. federal law that governs the collection of foreign intelligence information. This section of the act authorizes the U.S. government to collect foreign intelligence information from non-U.S. persons located outside the United States through the use of certain surveillance techniques, including the interception of electronic communications.

 

FISA 702 was enacted in 2008 and has been the subject of significant controversy, with some people raising concerns about the privacy implications of the U.S. government's ability to collect and use information about non-U.S. persons without a warrant. In recent years, there have been debates about whether the provisions of FISA 702 should be modified or reformed to better protect privacy and civil liberties.

 

It is important to note that FISA 702 is part of a larger framework of laws and regulations governing the collection of foreign intelligence information by the U.S. government. Organizations and individuals operating in or doing business with the U.S. should be aware of these laws and regulations and take steps to ensure that their activities are compliant with them.

 

 

What is FedRAMP?

 

FedRAMP is an abbreviation for the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program, established by the US government in 2011 to ensure that federal agencies were taking a responsible and risk-based approach to the use of cloud services, which include video conferencing and collaboration tools.

 

To be FedRAMP-compliant, the cloud service provider must be compliant with the FedRAMP framework for the standardized security requirements for use of these types of services. This is a way to ensure high security standards across the board and to be more consistent and effective in the selection of secure cloud-based technologies in every corner of the U.S. government.

 

 

What is the difference between Schrems, FISA 702, and cloud act?

 

"Schrems" refers to the landmark data privacy case Maximilian Schrems v. Facebook Ireland, which was decided by the European Court of Justice (ECJ) in 2015. In this case, the ECJ declared the Safe Harbour framework, which allowed the transfer of personal data from the European Union (EU) to the United States, to be invalid. This was due to concerns about the U.S. government's ability to access this data through various surveillance programs, including the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA).

 

FISA 702, is a section of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) that governs the collection of foreign intelligence information by the U.S. government. It authorizes the U.S. government to collect foreign intelligence information from non-U.S. persons located outside the United States through the use of certain surveillance techniques, including the interception of electronic communications. The CLOUD (Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data) Act is a U.S. federal law that was enacted in 2018. It allows U.S. law enforcement agencies to access data stored by U.S. technology companies, even if that data is stored outside the United States. The act also provides a framework for foreign governments to request access to data stored in the United States, subject to certain conditions.

 

The Schrems case, FISA 702, and the CLOUD Act are all related to the collection and use of personal data for foreign intelligence and law enforcement purposes. They reflect different legal frameworks and different approaches to balancing privacy and security interests and have significant implications for organizations operating in or doing business with the EU and the United States.

 

Protecting personal data is central to the increasing prevalence of data sovereignty laws and regulations around the world. Organizations and governments who are looking to take back control of their data should seek out a communication platform that enables full data ownership. Learn more about secure communications from Pexip here.

 

Topics:
  • Meet & collaborate securely
  • Secure Meetings
  • Secure Collaboration
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